Red Headed Woodpecker


This gorgeous bird is a somewhat rare sight for me and so every visit is a thrill. Apparently this type of bird used to be common, but the story has, sadly, changed. Normally they eat insects, but I think the peanut chips I put on a feeder tray every now and again, entices them in for a visit.
Getting ready to fly away with a treasured peanut.

26 thoughts on “Red Headed Woodpecker

    1. Lol, I do love my camera. Resolution isn’t so hot here, but I resized the image so small that I knew the clarity was going to suffer. Have had a little problem with my images being, “borrowed.”

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  1. I saw the Red Headed Woodpecker all the time when I was younger, never see them now. Just this summer I had a Blue Jay at my bird bath, they have been absent for many years l, about the time the West Nile wiped many birds out😩. Thanks for all your beautiful pictures and cute stories. They make me smile😊

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    1. I never, ever saw a woodpecker when I was younger, let alone a Red Headed one. Yes, West Nile was terribly hard on the birds. I felt so bad for them. Well now you made me smile! Thanks for such lovely compliments, the best of which is that I can make someone smile with my images.

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    1. Thanks! They’re so darn quick and visit so infrequently that I was really happy to capture this sweetheart.

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  2. I can imagine how thrilling it is to see this visitor. I’ve noticed too, that many of the songbirds that used to visit us here are either way down in numbers or they don’t show up at all. I think our songbirds are in big trouble.

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    1. It’s scary to think that they’re declining. One good thing here is that they have rebuilt the eagle population in our state. I now see one every so often and I can’t believe my eyes when I do. LOL, the white tail and white head are a dead giveaway though.

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          1. No, I don’t think so. The eagles are here for the herring in about February and March, and they pick off the weakest ducks and any other unsuspecting small animal (like a friend’s chickens), but they are too big and clumsy to go after the songbirds. I think the decline in the songbird population might have to do with a combination of pesticides, lit up city buildings, and some habitat loss. I’d put my money on the pesticides first.

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            1. So disheartening. I didn’t know, and never thought about how many birds are lost because of tall buildings…so many fly into windows!

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              1. I once saw a program about all the high-rises in big cities leaving their lights on at night, and how birds flew into them and fell to the ground. Every morning the first-floor shopkeepers had to sweep up the dead birds from in front of their stores. I doubt if that has changed much. They still leave all those lights on. A waste of birds and a waste of electricity.

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    2. Het is alsof je royalty ziet als het binnenvliegt. Dat is de enige manier waarop ik het kan omschrijven. Het hoofd ziet eruit als karmozijnrood fluweel en ik kan me bijna voorstellen dat het ook zo aanvoelt, maar ik weet dat het echt ‘veerzacht’ is, niet fluweelzacht.

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    1. Het is alsof je royalty ziet als het binnenvliegt. Dat is de enige manier waarop ik het kan omschrijven. Het hoofd ziet eruit als karmozijnrood fluweel en ik kan me bijna voorstellen dat het ook zo aanvoelt, maar ik weet dat het echt ‘veerzacht’ is, niet fluweelzacht.

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